Category: ksawrtmu

 

New York Bands Join Forces To Celebrate 20 Years Of Phish’s “Billy Breathes”

first_imgIn 1996, Phish released a game changing album called Billy Breathes. The album showed off more of a songwriting approach than previous releases, with ballads like “Waste” and “Talk” complementing hits like “Free,” “Theme From The Bottom,” “Prince Caspian” and more.With the 20-year anniversary of Billy Breathes on the minds of phans everywhere, the Brooklyn Bowl hosted an all-star tribute featuring jam bands in the New York area. The event was also co-hosted by Brookladelphia, which curates events that encourage creativity, collaboration & community. There’s no denying the influence that Phish has had on the ever-growing jam scene, which is why bands like Aqueous, Jimkata, Cousin Earth, Teddy Midnight, Escaper and Bad Faces joined together to honor the classic album.The show saw each band take on two or three of the Billy Breathes songs coupled with their own music, for an overall marathon performance honoring the classic Phish album. Check out Teddy Midnight’s take on “Cars Trucks Buses” and “Talk,” streaming below.Next up, Aqueous hits Philly’s Milkboy with Broccoli Samurai on 11/9! Get tickets here. Check out a full gallery of images below, courtesy of Capacity Images. Here’s Cousin Earth with a rocking take on “Character Zero.”And Bad Faces covering “Waste” and “Taste” from the 1996 album.center_img Load remaining imageslast_img read more

 

Clooney named 2010-11 Luce Fellow

first_imgThe Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada and the Henry Luce Foundation have named Francis X. Clooney, the Parkman Professor of Divinity and Professor of Comparative Theology at Harvard Divinity School, one of six Henry Luce III Fellows in Theology for 2010-11.The Luce Fellows program was established in 1993 to identify leading scholars in theological studies and provide them with the necessary financial support and recognition to facilitate their work. Clooney was selected as a Henry Luce III fellow for his excellence and creativity in theological commentarial writing. The fellowship program is one of the premier fellowship programs for theological scholarship.last_img read more

 

Shadowing the Supreme Court

first_imgWhile some Harvard students use the break between semesters to relax and recharge, others go for something a little more intense, like the chance to work on a legal case with sweeping implications.For the past several years, Harvard Law School (HLS) students have spent their break time in Washington, D.C., parsing reams of heady data and crafting nuanced legal arguments to cases headed for the U.S. Supreme Court.“The idea of the clinic is to get students exposure to working on actual Supreme Court cases at various stages,” said Kevin Russell, a lecturer on law at HLS and a partner in Goldstein & Russell, P.C., a small Washington firm that focuses on practicing before the Supreme Court.Russell and his partner, Harvard Lecturer Tom Goldstein, run the annual HLS Supreme Court Clinic that pairs small groups of students with the firm’s lawyers. For three weeks, the teams draft certiorari petitions — documents asking the Supreme Court to review cases ­— or briefs in opposition to certiorari. The students also work on merit and amicus briefs in support of a case, and on preparations for oral arguments.Last month, third-year HLS student Caitlin Halpern and her team helped to write a merit brief for a case involving a federal bank fraud statute. The court will hear Loughrin v. United States in April.Halpern and her teammates pored over similar cases, researched relevant statutes, and wrote a draft of the brief, with help from their instructor. The final step involved a rigorous, line-by-line edit of the document to hone its message. Halpern’s biggest takeaway from the clinic was the need to simplify.“My team went into the briefs thinking we wanted to answer every question and address every counter-argument. And our editing process involved a lot of focusing on themes and making things very straightforward … and not necessarily including every single detail.”Last year, students help to compile an amicus brief for the landmark case involving the Defense of Marriage Act. While at the clinic in 2007, HLS graduate Elizabeth Prelogar worked on a petition for certiorari concerning whether detainees at Guantanamo Bay had habeas corpus rights and whether legislation that stripped the federal courts of jurisdiction over claims by those detainees was constitutional.“I can’t imagine a better setting as a student to learn how to craft persuasive legal arguments in real-world cases,” said Prelogar, who is now an appellate attorney for the firm Hogan Lovells. “I learned a tremendous amount about effective brief writing and oral advocacy during the Winter Term, which helped me realize how much I love the process of litigating an appeal.”In addition to the bank-fraud case, this year’s students worked on two certiorari petitions involving prisoner’s rights. One addressed the question of whether prisoners can get exceptions to restrictions on hair length of they grow it long for religious reasons. The other focused on whether a person sentenced to death has the right to know the planned method of execution.While the clinic involves long days and late nights writing and revising briefs, as well as discussions with instructors about areas of Supreme Court practice, it also involves meetings with officials who help to decide federal policy and law. Students lunch with judges on the D.C. Circuit of Appeals and meet with members of the  U.S. Solicitor General’s office, which represents the federal government in cases before the high court.“They get to meet all these interesting people and kind of see the process from a practitioner’s perspective, which is, I think, fairly different from what you get in a lecture course where you are kind of reading the end result of that process,” said Russell.This time, the students also attended a moot court session at Georgetown University and traveled to the Supreme Court to hear oral arguments in the same case. Hearing the nine justices pose pointed, probing questions to each other, discuss complicated statutory issues, and suggest hypothetical scenarios was a highlight for Halpern.“It was really fun to see how the justices spar with one another … they came off as so smart and balanced.”Halpern said she also enjoyed seeing some of the members of the court live up to their reputations. Associate Justice Stephen Breyer was witty and professorial, at one point offering a lengthy explanation of the history of hay. Associate Justice Antonin Scalia had a minor outburst when he realized that the government hadn’t provided him with a part of a statute.Later that day the group spoke with Associate Justice Elena Kagan, the former HLS dean. She discussed her work with the court and how it differs from her time as U.S. solicitor general, when she was on the opposite side of the bench, arguing cases on behalf of the government.Another type of interaction stood out for HLS student Eden Schiffmann, who worked with Halpern on the bank-fraud case. Schiffmann said the chance to meet with Kevin Loughrin, a plaintiff convicted in Utah of bank fraud and sentenced to three years in prison, was a high point of the clinic.“Oftentimes, Supreme Court practice is described as monastic, where you don’t really have much interaction with the facts of the case or the events that gave rise to it,” said Schiffmann. “It was really great to be able to speak with the person whose life experiences gave rise to the case, and to understand how it will affect them if, hopefully, we win it.”The clinic’s pace is hectic. An early packet of information sent to the most recent attendees included a note stating that their free time would be limited. Halpern said their days usually began about 9 a.m. and included time for lunch, a dinner break around 7 or 8 p.m., followed by a few more hours of work. “It’s definitely been a demanding schedule,” she said. “We are certainly having time to eat and sleep, but not so much time to sightsee and hang out.”But the HLS students agreed the rewards were well worth it. Schiffmann called his experience invaluable.“I am grateful to Harvard for giving me the opportunity to do something that I think is exceptionally unusual, and was the kind of thing that I didn’t even know would be possible when I applied to law school.”last_img read more

 

Lost Town of Lignite

first_imgPermanence. It’s the illusion that shapes our perception of the world, not in a small way, but on a fundamental level. We are hard-wired from birth to understand the world in stasis, as, at best, a set of conditions that are permanent until they’re not anymore. But it doesn’t really work that way.Generations of Americans lived and died thinking slavery was an inevitable and fixed condition of human existence, that it was simply the way things are and would always be. In recent decades, and in America in particular, we’ve been struck by the illusion of everlasting safety, a natural disaster on the scale of the floods that killed as many as 3.7 million Chinese in 1931 seeming an utter impossibility. All of recorded human history, in fact, has arisen in a period of stability, a lull between the cataclysmic events that have repeatedly rocked the world, nearly annihilating all life on the planet, for billions of years.It was with that less than cheery thought that I got to thinking about ghost towns. Ghost towns poke a hole in the thin curtain separating the illusion of permanence from the terrifying reality that we live in a world in flux. That’s their fascination—the glimpse into not a kitschy, ersatz past like you find in Colonial Williamsburg, or the living river spanning a preserved past and present that you find in the great cities of Europe—but the world’s true history. The knowledge that all that is or ever was or will be fades—but no, it doesn’t fade. It becomes obliterated, devoured by time and age.Ghost towns of the west, blessed by a dry landscape and scrubby, stunted vegetation, remain at least somewhat preserved. And in their perfect preservation, butterflies under glass, they become tame and easily dismissed. They inspire 30 minutes of gawking, the word “neat!” and a shuffle back to the family car. But back on this side of the country, ghost towns have no such luxury. Cannibalized by nature, they reveal where all our attempts at permanence really end up.So when I heard about Virginia’s one true ghost town, I knew I had to go. There are dozens of old towns in Virginia that get tossed on lists of ghost towns in the U.S., places whose evocative names—Bigler’s Mill, Ca Ira, Goose Pond Hollow—appear on yellowed maps. But most have been ground into the earth and paved over or lie under dark water where rivers have been dammed and the land flooded. There are far fewer whose gutted remains lie exposed to the elements, skeletal but defiantly there.Of those, there is perhaps just one that satisfies both criteria for ghost towns outlined by ghost town researcher and author  T. Lindsay Baker. According to Baker, to qualify as a true ghost town, a place has to not only have some extant sign of habitation, but also has to have become obsolete. A proper ghost town has to have lost its very reason for being; think abandoned gold rush settlements or, if trends continue, Flint, Michigan, in thirty years. In that sense, a ghost town is the cruel double of its former self, something less than a memory. In Virginia, the one place that arguably satisfies both requirements is Lignite.Lignite: the name alone speaks to decay. Lignite is the shabbiest, lowest-quality coal, the product of millions of years of decay. Named for the stuff its residents hauled out of the ground in the late 1800s, the town of Lignite was once host to homes, a company store, churches and a main street theater. It was populated by miners and their sturdy wives, hacking a living out of a single seam of coal up in the mountains, at infinite remove from, say, Roanoke, the nearest city of any size but still at least a day’s journey away in the days before cars and interstates.I set out for Lignite on a cloudy day, caught Interstate 81 and rode it down the spine of the Appalachians. I turned off at an old country highway in Botetourt County, amid rolling farmland beneath the Blue Ridge.I drove past stone walls, trailers plopped down in clusters opposite Victorian clapboard houses with fresh, proud coats of paint; past cows browsing in fields that sat in the shadow of immense, timeworn barns that looked like they had been built of driftwood and rust; past feebly trickling streams and a wide, glass-surfaced river that sat almost motionless beneath a dense canopy of still-orange leaves. Drove up and then down a switchback mountain highway, slaloming my way just feet from a sheer drop to the forest floor far below.The drive took me through Fincastle, a quaint and charming town that nevertheless seemed custom-built to maintain the illusion of permanence. The center of town was almost entirely comprised of buildings erected in generations long past but maintained with obvious affection by the locals.The last stop before Lignite was Oriskany, which consisted of a post office—open noon to 2pm, Monday to Friday—the size of a minivan; a whitewashed, steepled church that had clearly been hosting potluck dinners for over a hundred years; a handful of low-slung houses puffing woodsmoke from their chimneys; and a cemetery that spilled over into a small playground and was filled with dozens of tombstones from the better part of the last century, all bearing just a handful of names: Tucker, King, Horton.And then just past an Airstream trailer, a gleaming lunchbox of a home, I spotted a painted wooden mile marker pointing down a pitted gravel lane. One mile and I’d be in Lignite, according to the sign. I parked, got out of the car, and began to walk.Not sure what to expect, I felt a mounting sense of disappointment as I reached a mile and had seen no sign other than the worn gravel road beneath my feet that anyone had ever been to the area. I began scanning the area for something, anything, when I noticed two decrepit foundations—of houses? Churches?  The theater?Just as I reached one of the stone foundations, the gray husk of formless cloud that had enveloped the sky all day cracked. Sunbeams fell through the dead vines and bare, grasping branches that twisted overhead. Far from bathing the paltry remains of human habitation in newfound warmth, the sunshine only heightened the vulgarity of exposing the last vestiges of humanity to the elements.It seemed truly unbelievable that in a single lifetime, a living, breathing, praying, working town had been ground down into nothing but forest floor, right down to the now-naked cellar that may have once lain under a kitchen suffused with the smell of bread baking and the voices of children sniping at each other behind their parents’ backs, or a theater filled with the echoing footfalls of a traveling troupe of actors treading the boards in front of an audience of families, or a country store stuffed with sacks of sugar, coffee, cured hams, tobacco. In less than 200 years, this place had gone from wilderness to civilization back to wilderness without the outside world even noticing.Then I spotted something white and unmistakably building-sized on a ridge ahead. I fell into a jog, but stopped as soon as I got close enough to actually see what I’d only glimpsed. There, between two gutted chimneys, somewhat more substantial signs of life than the foundations, was a small encampment: an RV, a camper trailer, and a tent. Only the flags twisting in the wind, dangling from a rope tied to the highest branch of a nearby tree, gave away that this was more than a camping trip, but a home, at least for a while. That this clearly wasn’t land that they owned and that of the two flags, the Confederate was hung higher than the American made me think they might not be entirely eager to talk to someone tramping up to their door and asking questions.As I walked back to my car, I thought that a sense of permanence, illusory though it may be, might just be the one true necessity of the human experience. We adapt. We hold on to what seems permanent and constant and true for as long as possible until time or circumstance or loss or love forces us to create a new permanent for ourselves. The miners who abandoned Lignite en masse didn’t die with the town. They pulled up stakes, went to where there was work, and resumed life. And if they had children born after the death of Lignite, those children grew up understanding their own circumstances as permanent, knowing of Lignite only in stories and secondhand memories. The world is always in flux, but the illusion of permanence does more than just let us cope with change. It lets us live.last_img read more

 

Cyber Security Prioritized under Paraguayan Presidency of Inter-American Committee against Terrorism

first_imgBy Dialogo May 06, 2015 The report also encourages governments to talk to each other about cyber security issues in and in certain cases to do so confidentially, which will allow the governments to share experiences and solutions. In it, the Executive Secretary of CICTE, Neil Klopfenstein, stated that “the governments of Latin American countries and countries around the world must recognize the serious vulnerabilities in their critical infrastructure and the grave consequences those could have if they are not properly protected.” More than 500 people from the public and private sectors, including leaders in information security and communications, attended the conference, which included panels and discussions on topics such as the protection of critical infrastructure; information security management systems; cyber security campaigns, and secure implementation of WiFi networks. Under Paraguay’s leadership, the agency is placing a greater emphasis on regional cyber security. CI was created in 1999 and ratified in June 2002 in an effort to prevent, combat and eliminate terrorism, including cyber terrorism; to that end, member meet once a year to discuss their future plans. Frequent cyber attacks have focused those meetings on cyber security in recent years. “CICTE has played an essential role in contributing to the creation of a culture and awareness about cyber security that encourages Latin American countries to work together both inside and outside the government,” said Francisco Denis Pereira, a security analyst at the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. “CICTE has made it possible for joint actions to continue their quick expansion throughout this hemisphere, because the OAS takes this subject very seriously.” Member States of the Organization of American States (OAS) have elected the Republic of Paraguay to the presidency of the Inter-American Committee against Terrorism (CICTE) for the 2015-2016 term. Elisa Ruiz Díaz Bariero, Paraguay’s Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the OAS, thanked all the delegates for their votes during a speech at the 15th Committee session in Washington, D.C. Overall, 44 percent of government institutions and critical industries — such as communications, finance, manufacturing and the energy sector — have faced cyber attacks, according to the “Report on Cyber Security and Critical Infrastructure in the Americas,” published in 2015 by the OAS in collaboration with Trend Micro, a global security software company. Forty percent of government institutions and critical industries have experienced attempts to shut down their system. The report includes practical cases from specific countries and a complete analysis of cyber attacks and the methods that were used. It provides a detailed explanation of the protective measures taken by government authorities and officials in critical private industries. The report also encourages governments to talk to each other about cyber security issues in and in certain cases to do so confidentially, which will allow the governments to share experiences and solutions. In it, the Executive Secretary of CICTE, Neil Klopfenstein, stated that “the governments of Latin American countries and countries around the world must recognize the serious vulnerabilities in their critical infrastructure and the grave consequences those could have if they are not properly protected.” Encouraging cooperation The Paraguayan Cyber Incident Response Center (CERT-PY) helps Paraguayan authorities engage in cooperation in the fight against cyber attacks. For example, through continual security bulletins, reports, and publications, CERT-PY promotes awareness campaigns on the variety of problems that can affect government agencies, businesses, and individuals. Paraguayan authorities created the center in 2012 to serve as a central coordination office to handle various security incidents that affect the country’s computer systems. It sends alerts about problems and works in coordination with the different government and private agencies, operating 24 hours a day and seven days a week. The report includes practical cases from specific countries and a complete analysis of cyber attacks and the methods that were used. It provides a detailed explanation of the protective measures taken by government authorities and officials in critical private industries. Cooperation between the public and private sector is also an important component of this effort. For example, during the third session of the Ibero-American Information Security Congress and Fair – SEGURINFO 2015 – held in March in Asunción, Paraguay, attendees from the public and private sectors formed a working group to develop a national cyber security plan to be launched throughout the country in 2015. The around-the-clock operation of CERT-PY reflects Paraguay’s commitment to cyber security. “CICTE has played an essential role in contributing to the creation of a culture and awareness about cyber security that encourages Latin American countries to work together both inside and outside the government,” said Francisco Denis Pereira, a security analyst at the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. “CICTE has made it possible for joint actions to continue their quick expansion throughout this hemisphere, because the OAS takes this subject very seriously.” Encouraging cooperation Cyber attacks are a regional concern “This mandate entrusted to us is a great honor and commitment for our country’s government. We will strive to make CICTE’s goals a reality.” Under Paraguay’s leadership, the agency is placing a greater emphasis on regional cyber security. CI was created in 1999 and ratified in June 2002 in an effort to prevent, combat and eliminate terrorism, including cyber terrorism; to that end, member meet once a year to discuss their future plans. Frequent cyber attacks have focused those meetings on cyber security in recent years. The around-the-clock operation of CERT-PY reflects Paraguay’s commitment to cyber security. Overall, 44 percent of government institutions and critical industries — such as communications, finance, manufacturing and the energy sector — have faced cyber attacks, according to the “Report on Cyber Security and Critical Infrastructure in the Americas,” published in 2015 by the OAS in collaboration with Trend Micro, a global security software company. Forty percent of government institutions and critical industries have experienced attempts to shut down their system. Member States of the Organization of American States (OAS) have elected the Republic of Paraguay to the presidency of the Inter-American Committee against Terrorism (CICTE) for the 2015-2016 term. Elisa Ruiz Díaz Bariero, Paraguay’s Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the OAS, thanked all the delegates for their votes during a speech at the 15th Committee session in Washington, D.C. The Paraguayan Cyber Incident Response Center (CERT-PY) helps Paraguayan authorities engage in cooperation in the fight against cyber attacks. For example, through continual security bulletins, reports, and publications, CERT-PY promotes awareness campaigns on the variety of problems that can affect government agencies, businesses, and individuals. Paraguayan authorities created the center in 2012 to serve as a central coordination office to handle various security incidents that affect the country’s computer systems. It sends alerts about problems and works in coordination with the different government and private agencies, operating 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Cyber attacks are a regional concern During SEGURINFO 2015, David Ocampos, Paraguay’s Minister of Information Technology and Communication, emphasized in his announcement that “it is necessary to have the capability and organization to prevent and block any incident or cyber threat.” Cooperation between the public and private sector is also an important component of this effort. For example, during the third session of the Ibero-American Information Security Congress and Fair – SEGURINFO 2015 – held in March in Asunción, Paraguay, attendees from the public and private sectors formed a working group to develop a national cyber security plan to be launched throughout the country in 2015. Paraguay developing a national cyber security plan During SEGURINFO 2015, David Ocampos, Paraguay’s Minister of Information Technology and Communication, emphasized in his announcement that “it is necessary to have the capability and organization to prevent and block any incident or cyber threat.” More than 500 people from the public and private sectors, including leaders in information security and communications, attended the conference, which included panels and discussions on topics such as the protection of critical infrastructure; information security management systems; cyber security campaigns, and secure implementation of WiFi networks. “This mandate entrusted to us is a great honor and commitment for our country’s government. We will strive to make CICTE’s goals a reality.” Paraguay developing a national cyber security plan last_img read more

 

In Panama, NCO Trains Security Forces on Medical Response

first_imgBy Clifford Kyle Jones/NCO Journal November 29, 2016 “Fuego! Fuego! Fuego!” Sgt. 1st Class Russell Planer shouts through a bullhorn, and four-person teams of Panamanian security forces dash off with their stretchers to locate their “injured” compadre. The teams are participating in an exercise. It’s part of the medical training that Sgt. Planer runs to improve the agents’ response times and steel them for shootouts with narcotics traffickers. The country has no military, but the combined security forces of Panama’s Ministry of Public Security that protect the nation from illegal activity at its borders, seaports, and famous canal can face armed conflicts with cartel members that are reminiscent of a war zone. And one of the missions of the U.S. Army’s Technical Assistance Field Team (TAFT) in Panama is to help keep them safe. “They take fire when a casualty is down, and they have to remove the casualty from under fire to a semi-safe location,” Sgt. 1st Class Planer said, describing the exercise at a training site in Panama City, Panama. “Then they have to do a very quick evaluation of the patient. If there’s major hemorrhage, they put a tourniquet on that extremity and control that major hemorrhage. Then they do a quick sweep over the casualty to make sure that they haven’t missed anything. At that time, they’re prepared to put them on a litter and remove them from the fire zone,” Sgt. Planer added. They carry the patient about a kilometer away to a more secure location and then begin tactical field care. They check over all the major organ systems and examine eyes, ears, nose, and mouth. They conduct tests on the patient’s pulse and motor systems. They inspect the body for fractures or any other sort of injury, including at the spine and back. They treat the patient as they go and reevaluate regularly to ensure treatments are working, Sgt. Planer said. After determining vital sign statistics and mechanism of injury, the team can assess bleeding, and the medics will know whether to administer fluids and how much. The teams consist of agents who play the roles of medic, assistant medic, security, and litter carrier. A fifth member plays the patient. Sgt. Planer runs the exercise multiple times, so each officer has the chance to fill each role. Each must place tourniquets, remove patients, control the team and administer fluids intravenously. Blood runs down several of the arms of the patients as Sgt. Planer and an assistant, who was tapped from Panamanian security forces to help after a previous iteration of the course, walk from team to team, evaluating the medics’ performance. “That IV is actually [taught] much later [in the course], but we’re doing the IV now for the stress level and practice because they have to do an IV to finish the course,” Sgt. Planer said. The final event requires the medics to complete treatment in 25 minutes. “I push them under the fire stage to be under three minutes,” Sgt. Planer said. “They have a maximum of six minutes, but remember, it’s 25 minutes, so if they use six minutes there, they only have 19 minutes for full treatments, which is putting on splints, treating wounds, intubation and so on and so forth. “This [event] plays into the lanes because it gives them a very little taste of what they’re going to have to do for the full event at the end,” Sgt. Planer continued. “This is just the very first portion.” Yadiza Pérez, the agent who helps teach the course, is one of Sgt. Planer’s students from earlier classes. “She was one of the star students, so to speak,” Sgt. Planer said. “She was very good, very motivated. She was helping her compadres, her partners.” Using star pupils to assist with later courses fits into the overall strategy of the TAFT to develop a train-the-trainer strategy when assisting partner nations. It also allows Sgt. Planer to increase the student capacity of the course, he said. TAFTs are deployed by the U.S. Army Security Assistance Training Management Organization (USASATMO), a subordinate organization to U.S. Army Security Assistance Command. USASATMO currently has 38 TAFTs and 43 teams in more than 20 countries around the world. Sgt. Planer played a critical role in developing the Program of Instruction (POI) for the medical course, said Maj. Bernard Gardner, who leads the TAFT in Panama. “There’s a lot of trust involved,” Maj. Gardner said. “There’s a lot of communication that the NCOs have to do to make sure we’re meeting the right capability that the Panamanians are requesting. And then in doing that, they identify that capability and they develop POIs.” All the NCOs in the TAFT team must be fluent Spanish speakers, but they also must write well in Spanish. Sgt. 1st Class Planer developed the written version of the POI in English and Spanish, in addition to teaching complex medical terms and concepts in Spanish. “Another thing that people don’t realize is the written communication skills that these guys bring to the table,” Maj. Gardner said. “Everything that we do here, we have a written correspondence, basically it’s the equivalent of Army memorandums. “There is official correspondence to the Ministry of Defense that we push all this training through to answer their needs and to ensure that everyone has a visibility and it’s meeting the intent and the capability they requested.” “There’s a good two weeks where (Sgt. Planer was) just sitting down developing the POI in excruciating detail so it communicates the right intent,” Maj. Gardner said. And as any member of Panama’s security forces knows, Sgt. Planer’s intent is to keep them safe under fire.last_img read more

 

April 15, 2004 Notices

first_imgApril 15, 2004 Notices NoticesAppointments to be filled in May The Board of Governors is seeking applicants for the following vacancies to be filled during its May 28 meeting: ABA House of Delegates: Three lawyers (one under 35 delegate) to serve two-year terms commencing August 11 at the conclusion of the ABA Annual Meeting in Atlanta. Applicants must also be ABA members. Florida Legal Services, Inc., Board of Directors: Five lawyers to serve two-year terms commencing July 1. This is a 21-member board that provides civil legal assistance to indigent persons. Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc., Board of Directors: Four lawyers and one nonlawyer to serve three-year terms commencing July 1. This 15-member board assists the legal community in securing counseling and treatment for emotional and chemical dependency problems for lawyers. Florida Medical Malpractice Joint Underwriting Association Board of Governors: One lawyer to serve a two-year term commencing July 1. This is a nine-member board of governors that develops a means of obtaining loss and expense experience in medical malpractice issues. Supreme Court’s Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee: One attorney to serve a four-year term commencing July 1, 2004. This is a 12-member committee that renders written advisory opinions to inquiring judges concerning the propriety of contemplated judicial and non-judicial conduct. Persons interested in applying for any of these vacancies may download the Application for Special Appointment from the Bar’s Web site, www.flabar.org, or should call Bar headquarters at(850) 561-5600, ext. 5757, to obtain the application form. Applications may also be obtained by writing the Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300. Completed applications must be received by the executive director no later than 5:30 p.m. May 7. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of the required application. The Board of Governors will review all applications and may request telephone or personal interviews.17th JNC seeks to fill judgeship The 17th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications to fill a circuit court vacancy created by the resignation of Judge Julie Koenig. Applicants must have been members of The Florida Bar for at least five years, registered voters, and residents of the 17th Circuit. Applications and instructions are available on The Florida Bar Web site at www.flabar.org or by contacting Gina R. Pozzuoli, JNC Chair, 110 SE 6th St., 15th Floor, Ft. Lauderdale 33301, phone (954) 762-2510. An original and nine copies of the completed applications (with photographs) must be received by Pozzuoli no later than April 29 at 5 p.m. Applications received after the deadline will not be considered. Grossman nominated for Health Law chair The Health Law Section’s Nominating Committee has nominated Allen R. Grossman of Tallahassee for the position of chair-elect for 2004-2005. The committee has also nominated Laurie J. Levin of Orlando for treasurer, and Harold E. Kaplan of Coral Spring for secretary for the 2004-2005 term. With regard to the four executive council seats, with terms expiring June 30, 2007, the committee nominated Leonard Dietzen, Tallahassee; Gary W. Huston, Pensacola; Lester J. Perling, Ft. Lauderdale; and James Gary Walker, Tampa. The Health Law Section will meet to elect its 2004-2005 officers and executive council members on June 24 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. during The Florida Bar’s Annual Meeting at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. All members of the Health Law Section are encouraged to attend. Section 7.4 of the Health Law Section Bylaws allows for other nominations to be made by petition of at least 15 voting members of the section. The petition must be filed with the chair no later than 30 days prior to the date of the Annual Meeting.Rotstein petitions for reinstatement Pursuant Rule Bar 3-7.10, Jonathan Issac Rotstein has petitioned the Florida Supreme Court for Bar reinstatement. The court suspended Rotstein from the practice of law for engaging in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation as well as engaging in a conflict of interest effective December 8, 2002, for a period of one year. Any persons having knowledge bearing upon Rotstein’s fitness or qualifications to resume the practice of law should contact: Elizabeth Sikora Conan, Bar Counsel, The Florida Bar, 1200 Edgewater Dr., Orlando 32804-6314, (407) 425-5424.Middle District proposes local rules amendments Pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 83, Fed. R. Crim. P. 57, and 28 U.S.C. §2071, notice is hereby given of proposed amendments to the Local Rules for the U.S. District Court, Middle District of Florida. A copy of the proposed amendments may be obtained from the court’s Internet site, www.flmd.uscourts.gov. A copy may also be obtained without charge from the intake counter at each divisional office. Comments on the proposed amendments must be received in writing by the Clerk of Court at 80 North Hughey Ave. Orlando 32801-2278, by April 30.Chief Judge Mark up for reappointment The current 14-year term of Chief Judge Robert A. Mark of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Florida at Miami, will expire on October 31. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit is presently considering Judge Mark’s request for reappointment to a new 14-year term. Upon reappointment, the incumbent would continue to exercise the jurisdiction of a bankruptcy judge as specified in Title 28, United States Code; Title 11, United States Code; and the Bankruptcy Amendments and Federal Judgeship Act of 1984, Pub. L. No. 98-353, §§ 101-122, 98 Stat. 333-346. Members of the Bar and the public are invited to submit to the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals written comments concerning the incumbent’s reappointment. All comments will be considered confidential unless otherwise directed. Comments should be forwarded to Norman E. Zoller, Circuit Executive, 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, 56 Forsyth Street, NW, Atlanta, GA 30303. Comments must be received no later than April 28.Comments sought on Magistrate Davis The current term of the office of U.S. Magistrate Gordon Miles Davis, at Pensacola, is due to expire on November 25. The U.S. District Court is required by law to establish a panel of citizens to consider the reappointment of the magistrate judge to a new eight-year term. Comments from members of the Bar and the public are invited as to whether the incumbent magistrate judge should be recommended by the panel for reappointment by the court and should be directed to: William M. MeCool, Clerk, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida, 111 N. Adams St., Tallahassee 32301. Comments must be received by April 30.Comments sought on Magistrate Sherrill The current term of the office of U.S. Magistrate William C. Sherrill, Jr., at Tallahassee, is due to expire on November 30. The U.S. district court is required by law to establish a panel of citizens to consider the reappointment of the magistrate judge to a new eight-year term. Comments from members of the Bar and the public are invited as to whether the incumbent magistrate judge should be recommended by the panel for reappointment by the court and should be directed to: William M. McCool, Clerk, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida, 111 N. Adams St., Tallahassee 32301. Comments must be received by April 30.Northern District revises its rules The United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida recently revised its local rules. Substantive revisions to procedures for attorney admission, including pro hac vice admission, are included in this revision. The local rules are available for review on the court’s Web site located at www.flnd.uscourts.gov. The court also has announced the publication of the Case Management/Electronic Case Files (CM/ECF) Attorney’s User Manual to the court’s Web site as well. The manual contains helpful filing information, technical directions, links to relevant Web pages, and links to many frequently asked questions.U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Southern District, plans to amend local rules The U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of Florida has set an April 30 deadline for comments on proposed amendments to the court’s local rules, guidelines, and forms. Copies of the proposed amended rules and related local forms and guidelines are available free of charge at the clerk’s offices located at: • Miami: 51 S.W. First Avenue, Room 1517. • Ft. Lauderdale: 299 East Broward Boulevard, Room 112. • West Palm Beach: 701 Clematis Street, Room 202. The proposed amendments and related documents are also posted on the court’s Web site at www.flsb.uscourts.gov under “Latest News.” Any comments must be submitted in writing and mailed or delivered to Karen Eddy, Clerk, U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of Florida, 51 S.W. First Ave., Room 1517, Miami, FL 33130-1669. An en banc hearing to consider public comments is provisionally scheduled for May 14, at 10:30 a.m. in Courtroom 1406, Claude Pepper Federal Building, 51 S.W. First Avenue, Miami. If any party wishes to address the court at the public hearing, a request to appear, including an estimate of the length of time of the presentation, must accompany the written comments.Appellate mediation training set for May The Fifth District Court of Appeal has set an appellate mediation training session for certified mediators to serve as a mediator for Fifth DCA pilot program for May 7 at the Savannah Center at 1545 Buena Vista Boulevard, The Villages, FL 32158. The program will have significant intellectual and practical content and will constitute an organized program of learning directly related to the practice of mediation at the appellate level. The cost is $100 and preregistration is required by April 23. For more information or to resister, visit www.5dca.org. April 15, 2004 Noticeslast_img read more

 

Get Off Of My Cloud

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [dropcap]W[/dropcap]hen I told people I would be spending the afternoon with an emergency chute glued to my back, while strapped into the front seat of a plane the size of a Smart car, they looked at me like I was not too long for this world.Illustration by Jon MorenoI pulled up to Republic Airport in misty could-go-either-way weather, parked my car in a back lot and walked toward the hangar. In front of me was this model toy plane, red and blue, plastic bubble on top.It was adorable, and presumably left there to greet guests, like me, at the entrance. I stopped and peered inside, then made my way to Lt. Colonel John Klatt’s trailer.Klatt was in town to perform at the Jones Beach air show. And if you’ve ever been there, he’s the guy bouncing around the clouds in the world famous Staudacher S-300D, a 1,250-pound high-performance aerobatic aircraft, which tops out at 250 mph.He’s also a veteran of three combat tours in Iraq, who has logged more than 2,000 hours at the controls of the F-16 alone and served in the Air National Guard for more than 20 years, flying combat, air support and humanitarian missions throughout the world.Now a member of the 148th fighter wing of the Duluth Air National Guard, Klatt spends his free time wowing audiences across the world by defying gravity every chance he gets.Today he was meeting me in Farmingdale for a tour of Long Island’s skies in his two-seater plane, capable of pulling more than 20 Gs, which is twice the load of the F-16 “Fighting Falcon” Klatt flies in his “day job.”That toy plane in the parking lot—not a toy.I was climbing in the front seat, and Klatt was climbing in behind me, with only a thin plastic canopy between us and the wild blue yonder. He’d be controlling the plane from the back so I’d get the full pilot experience.I took a deep breath as one of the guys strapped me in so tightly I couldn’t move any part of my body even an inch. Then he tucked something under the belt on my leg.“Just in case,” he said. It was a plastic bag. Now I was really getting nervous, and thankful the only thing I had eaten that day was a strawberry.Klatt started the engine. I couldn’t see him but I was wearing a mic so we could talk to each other and I could ask questions.We sped down the runway, I felt like I was strapped to a cannonball. Then, in a matter of seconds, I was in another world, 3,000 feet up.I couldn’t stop looking down at the ground. The sky was blue up above the clouds, and another toy plane, this one red, pulled up right next to us.The pilot waved to me. I waved back. I felt like the Red Baron—the Snoopy version.Klatt asked me, “So, you want the regular ride or the wild ride?”I was feeling great, so I didn’t give it a second thought before I asked for the latter.With that the plane jerked 90 degrees and we were going straight up to the sun, perpendicular to the ground. I felt weightless as we paused for barely a second before swirling and spinning straight back down, then flipped over and flew in a straight line upside-down over the Robert Moses Causeway.Strangely enough, dangling upside down over Long Island seems very natural. Things don’t look real from up there, where the tide is coming in above and the sky is at your feet.Today, I can’t even get down to the beach because the bridge is closed. After super storm Sandy, the whole area is shut down. There are orange cones and construction vehicles everywhere so the view over the causeway just isn’t the same on the ground. But if I were up there, I’m sure nothing would be lost.From above, everything looks so small, especially the things that are so big and heavy down here. We flew over a cemetery, which looked like a checkerboard of little white Chiclets from up there and nothing more, and I didn’t even realize what it was until I saw a group of little dots gathered around one of them.“I’ve always enjoyed airplanes,” said Klatt, who began flying at 17. “My dad used to take me to air shows as a kid and I was always excited about it.”After a few more loops, rollovers and a hammerhead or two—whereby the plane did a literal cartwheel across the sky—it was time to head back down to Earth. We had been up there about 20 minutes. I didn’t want to come down.Slowly the beautiful white Chiclets became headstones and everything was real again. I felt sick, not in some spiritual and transformative way. I felt sick to my stomach, and I was reaching for the bag tucked in the straps on my leg, simultaneously glad that I had only eaten that strawberry and remembering that there was a video camera focused right on my face, recording every second of my in-flight experience.Klatt later explained to me that the body has to learn to adapt to the changes in gravity. This was my first step. In other words, next time I’d be a little less nauseous.Back on the ground, I climbed out of the plane, a little wobbly on my feet. Someone handed me a tape that I vowed to never let anyone watch, ever.Back home, I turned the TV on, popped the tape in, cringed for a few minutes, then pushed the play button.Nothing.It was blank. The camera on the plane didn’t record.I was a little disappointed and a little relieved. If something on the plane had to fail 3,000 feet above the ground, I’m glad it was the camera.last_img read more

 

Don’t go chasing waterfall: Agile thinking helps credit unions better respond to change

first_imgIf the many conversations Callahan & Associates has held with industry technologists across 2019 are any indication, credit unions might soon stop chasing waterfall.Waterfall, of course, is a software development methodology. But it’s not the only one, and many credit unions are turning in another direction entirely to meet the demands of a rapidly changing financial services environment. Perhaps your credit union has considered adopting agile.Callahan leaders have discussed the pros and cons of changing to an agile methodology with all manner of clients during our technology roundtables, consulting work, and strategic planning sessions. Additionally, we’ve written several case studies profiling successful credit union adoptions.We’ve learned enough to understand the benefits of an agile approach, which is why Callahan underwent agile training earlier this year with a goal to fully adopt the methodology in the coming months. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

 

Blueberry-Lime Margarita.

first_imgFood & DiningLifestyle Blueberry-Lime Margarita. by: – July 22, 2011 Share Share Sharing is caring! Share Blueberry-Lime Margarita.Frozen limeade adds zing to this stellar blueberry margarita.Recipe NutritionPer serving: 125 calories; 1 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g mono unsaturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 31 g carbohydrates; 0 g protein; 2 g fiber; 6 mg sodium; 147 mg potassium Nutrition Bonus: Potassium, vitamin C, phytochemicals.Ingredients:2 cups ice1 cup frozen blueberries1 cup blueberry nectar1/4 cup seltzer2 tablespoons frozen limeade1 tablespoon lime juice3 ounces tequila, optional1 lime wedgeCoarse salt 30 Views   no discussions Directions:Combine ice, blueberries, blueberry nectar, seltzer, limeade, lime juice and tequila, if using, in a blender and blend until smooth. Rub rim of 2 glasses with lime wedge and dip in salt. Divide the margarita between the prepared glasses and serve.Recipe source: EatingWell.com Tweetlast_img read more